Climate Justice Paris Agreement

-It should be noted in particular that the agreement provides funds for adaptation to climate change, managed by the Global Environmental Facility (GEF) through its small grants programme. As part of the Paris Agreement on Climate Change of December 2015[1] and Joint Decision 1/CP.21 adopting the Paris Agreement[2], the 196 Member States have: which make up the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), launched a massive expansion of investments in its various climate initiatives to address the climate crisis with investments of up to $100 billion per year in mitigation and adaptation policies. Our research investigates, contextualizes and evaluates the effectiveness of the overall funding of mitigation and adaptation programmes under the agreement and generates knowledge on their impact on human rights and climate justice through exemplary case studies, for example in the case of the UNFCCC Green Environment Facility (GEF) Small Grants Program in Antigua. This article takes a capacity approach to critically analyze, in the interest of climate justice, whether the Paris Agreement is likely to adequately protect human and non-human capacities from the effects of climate disasters. The author concludes that the parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change still have a long way to go in their negotiations on reduction, adaptation, loss and damage, before they hope to achieve their agreed temperature targets and protect human and non-human capacities from climate disasters. In any case, adaptation versus mitigation offers only a modest response to climate change and current financial commitments to financing adaptation in developing countries are far too low. While the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030 and the Sustainable Development Goals contain actions to be taken in a climate-changing world, these instruments are in their early stages of implementation and there is no indication yet whether they will address the challenges of climate disasters in a timely manner. Although the UNFCCC does not control specific assistance or protection for people directly affected by climate change in general, in armed conflict or in a state of occupation, there are some measures that could help mitigate climate change. Israel must respect and fulfil its obligations under international humanitarian law, which protects both the civilian population and the natural environment. In addition, humanitarian and development actions for vulnerable communities within the OPT must “increasingly focus on supporting people`s resilience”, enabling “sustainable improvements in people`s lives”, focusing on their livelihoods, natural resources, social networks, basic services and infrastructure that help people cope with the effects of armed conflict. and adapt to climate risks. The peculiarities of rural areas make them particularly vulnerable to the effects of climate change.

We will first participate in the UN Climate Change Summit to be held in Bonn in December 2017 to interview stakeholders (UNFCCC officials, national delegations, civil society organisations) and continue negotiations in the decisive phase of the implementation of the Paris Agreement. We will then look at how this process is unfolding in a pilot study on the changing context of UN climate policy in the small island developing state of Antigua. With regard to the Occupied Palestinian Territory (OPT), the Israeli occupation has caused significant damage to the environment through the exploitation and appropriation of its natural resources. Armed conflict significantly harms the environment and resource-dependent communities, leading, inter alia, to human exploitation, structural inequalities and marginalization. Although the UNFCCC and the Paris Agreement do not contain specific provisions on the interaction between climate change and conflict, this link is recognised. . . .